MOMMA, WILL YOU?
Picture Book - Grades Preschool-3rd Grade

Written by Dori Chaconas
Illustrated by Steve Johnson & Lou Fancher

Viking Children's Books
ISBN 0-670-05907-2

A little boy is eager to show his baby sister all the wonderful things in his world .

Pre-reading:
-
Talk about each animal depicted in the book.  In what way is each animal helpful to people? 

Knowledge:
-
Does the family in the story live in the city or on farm?  
- Name three animals in the book that you might find on a farm.
- Name three animals that you might find in a city.

Application:
-  What are some things from your world you might like to show a friend? 
- What are some things you might like to learn about from a friend's world?
- Arrange a Show and Tell Day.

Analysis:
-  A farm might have many different animals. What would each animal eat?
- What would you call each animals' baby?
Hen (chick), horse (foal), cat (kitten), cow (calf), wren (chick), goose (gosling), pig (piglet), dog (pup), mouse (pup or pinky.)

Verbal/Linguistic:
- Sing "Old MacDonald Had a Farm," following the order of the animal silhouettes in the book.

Auditory:
- In the groups of words below, some of the words begin with the same sound.  Some do not.  Have the children listen to the words as the teacher speaks them, then answer yes, no, or maybe.

HEN - HORSE - HOUSE                
GOOSE - GOAT - KITTEN           
WREN - RABBIT - WHALE        
CAT - COW - MOUSE
PONY - PIG - PUPPY
DUCK - DOG - BARN


Logical/Math:
- Make a list of the animals in the book, beginning with the smallest and working toward the largest. (Don't forget the human animals!)

Visual/Spatial:
- Make a paper "quilt."  Have the students draw a farm  animal on a square piece of construction paper.  Each of these squares will be a quilt block.  Ask  the children to draw a decorative border around the edge of the block. Arrange the finished "quilt blocks" on a cork board, or tape them to a wall, butting the edges against each other.

SAMPLE PAPER QUILT

Body/Kinesthetic:
- Play Farmer, May I?  A child asks permission to perform a simple action, ending his request with "Yes, or no, or maybe." Example: "Farmer, may I clap my hands? Yes, or no, or maybe?" If the farmer responds yes, the child performs the action.  If the farmer responds no, the child does nothing. If the farmer responds maybe, the whole class performs the action.

Intrapersonal:
In the story, sometimes Momma answers a question with a yes, sometimes with a no, and sometimes with a maybe.  Do you think the mother should have always answered yes? Do you think the boy was  upset when his mother answered no? Talk about each scenario and discuss the mother's reasons for answering as she did.
   

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       2006 Dori Chaconas